Pet FAQ

Q: How long is a dog or cat in heat?

A: Typically, 3 weeks total. One week coming in, one week during, and one week coming out.

Q: How long is a dog or cat pregnant?

A: 62 days

Q: How old should a dog or cat be before spaying or neutering?

A: Usually, about 5 to 6 months of age, but it can be done earlier if necessary.

Q: How much does it cost to spay or neuter my pet?

A: The price varies according to size, age, and species. All of our surgeries include: a comprehensive exam, pre-anesthetic blood work, pre and post-operation pain relief, the anesthetic injection, gas, the surgery itself, and an antibiotic injection. We use dissolvable sutures, so there will be no sutures to be removed or that your pet may chew out.

Q: My dog has fleas, what do I do?

A: Pets need to be on a flea/ tick preventative year round. Our weather is mild enough that fleas and ticks flourish even during our winter months. We recommend Vectra 3D for dogs and Advantage Multi for cats. If your pet is having trouble with fleas it can take up to three months to get the flea population under control.

Q: Is there anything that can be given to abort puppies in a pregnant dog?

A: No. We believe that spaying or neutering your pet is the best prevention.

Q: What should be done to prepare my pet prior to an anesthetic procedure (spay/neuter/dental cleaning)?

A: Your pet should be fasted prior to any anesthetic procedure. Withhold food and water after midnight the night before and the morning of the procedure. If your pet is on medication for a condition your pet may have their medications the morning of surgery. Diabetic patients should receive a HALF dose of their insulin the morning of surgery. We also recommend having a can of chicken broth or soup on hand for the night your pet comes home.

Q: When should I get my puppy/kitten vaccinated? Which ones do they need?

A: Puppies and kittens start their vaccinations at 6 weeks and need a total of three sets of boosters. The boosters are administered 3 weeks apart and then can be done yearly for preventative care.

Puppy Preventative Care Protocol

6 weeks

  • DHLPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parvo, Parainfluenza) Vaccine
  • Deworming
  • Fecal Analysis
  • Heartworm Preventative

  • 9 weeks

  • DHLPP Vaccine
  • Bordetella Vaccine
  • Deworming
  • Heartworm Preventative

  • 12 weeks

  • DHLPP Vaccine
  • Bordetella Vaccine
  • Rabies Vaccine
  • Deworming
  • Heartworm Preventative
  • Heartworm Preventative to go home.

  • Spay or neuter at 4- 6 months old

    Kitten Preventative Care Protocol

    6 weeks

  • FVRP Vaccine
  • Fecal Anaylisis
  • Deworming
  • Heartworm Preventative

  • 9 weeks

  • FVRCP Vaccine
  • FeLv/FIV test
  • Leukemia Vaccine
  • Deworming
  • Heartworm Preventative

  • 12 weeks

  • FVRCP Vaccine
  • Leukemia Vaccine
  • Rabies Vaccine
  • Deworming
  • Heartworm Preventative
  • Heartworm Preventative to go home

  • Spay or neuter at 4- 6 months old

    Q: Should my puppy be around other dogs?

    A: For your pets’ safety, we advise avoiding all public places (especially parks) and socializing them with other dogs until they have completed all of their puppy vaccines. We want your pup to stay healthy, so refraining from these activities greatly reduces the risk of your pet coming in contact with the highly contagious and often fatal soil-borne, water-borne, and air-borne diseases.

    Q: What other preventative care if any does my senior pet need?

    A: Senior pets still require vaccinations and monthly heartworm preventative, as well as their monthly flea/tick control. Additional things to a well senior checkup will be a blood panel every 6 months rather than yearly, possible x-rays to check for arthritis, urinalysis to check kidney function / diabetes risk. Your senior pet may also need medications for arthritis if they are just not as peppy as before.